Polio Place

A service of Post-Polio Health International

Living With Polio

Millions of individuals who had polio are living in all areas of the world. Survivors range in age from a few months to nonagenarians (in their nineties). Aftereffects vary greatly depending on the number and location of the nerve cells destroyed by the poliovirus. The challenge or ease of living with polio varies for each survivor, depending on the availability of medical care and rehabilitation opportunities, and their family and social support.

Advice, hints, explanations, etc., are categorized by topic and are searchable. The source of the material is identified.

Reminder: PHI’s post-polio.org and IVUN’s ventusers.org or ventnews.org features numerous articles to assist in living with polio.

What Does Future Holds for Young Polio Survivor

Post-Polio Health, Volume 31, Number 2, Spring 2015.

The following question has come to Post-Polio Health International a number of times via phone, email and letter. We asked our regular Post-Polio Health columnists Frederick M. Maynard, MD; Rhoda Olkin, PhD; and Stephanie Machell, PsyD, to comment on it for our readers.

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2016 WE'RE STILL HERE! Photo Contest

For WE'RE STILL HERE! Week, October 9-15, 2016, PHI asked of its Members - Send us a photo that illustrates polio survivors are active participants in family life. Have you taken your grandkids on a trip? Have you participated in their school activities? Do you contribute to your family life day to day in ways that may “surprise” others who do not have a disability?

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Margaret Pfrommer and My Career

Allen I. Goldberg, MD, MBA, Master FCCP, Illinois

BEFORE MEETING MARGARET PFROMMER

I need to go back to my medical school days at Downstate in Brooklyn. In 1967, I was given an opportunity by my medical school and the French Government to visit France.

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Imperative to Fight Ableism

Karen Hagrup

I am disabled and proud. I have a doctorate and two daughters. I live in a nice condo with my partner. I’m retired and volunteer regularly in my community. People come to me for help. I rarely worry anymore about others’ attitudes toward my impairment; they’ve probably got it wrong anyway.

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Explaining PPS to New Friends

Post-Polio Health, Volume 30, Number 3, Summer 2014.

Dr. Rhoda Olkin is a Distinguished Professor of Clinical Psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology in San Francisco, as well as Executive Director of the Institute on Disability and Health Psychology.
She is a polio survivor and single mother of two grown children.

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