Polio Place

A service of Post-Polio Health International

advocacy

Imperative to Fight Ableism

Karen Hagrup

I am disabled and proud. I have a doctorate and two daughters. I live in a nice condo with my partner. I’m retired and volunteer regularly in my community. People come to me for help. I rarely worry anymore about others’ attitudes toward my impairment; they’ve probably got it wrong anyway.

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A Gentle Death, Part III

Part III of a three part series published in Post-Polio Health, (Volume 29, Number 4) in 2013. 

Nancy Baldwin Carter, BA, MEd Psych, Omaha, Nebraska

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A Gentle Death, Part II

Part II of a three part series published in Post-Polio Health, (Volume 29, Number 3) in 2013.

Nancy Baldwin Carter, BA, MEd Psych, Omaha, Nebraska

Surely we don’t need studies to prove that planning ahead is a good idea, yet plenty of them exist, even when it comes to end-of-life issues. The goal, of course, is to assure that a patient’s medical care will ensure the greatest measure of comfort and serenity possible.

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A Gentle Death, Part I

Part I of a three part series published in Post-Polio Health, (Volume 29, Number 2) in 2013.

Nancy Baldwin Carter, BA, MEd Psych, Omaha, Nebraska

My mother has been on my mind. She’s been gone now for ten years. Death finally came to her after several merciless years of progressive suffering and pain in the nursing home she had selected to take care of her. We had all discussed end-of-life issues with Mother; we knew this was exactly the quality of life she hoped to avoid.

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Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

The US Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) ensures that all children with disabilities are entitled to a free appropriate public education to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living. Prior to IDEA, over 4 million children with disabilities were denied appropriate access to public education. Many children were denied entry into public school altogether, while others were placed in segregated classrooms, or in regular classrooms without adequate support for their special needs.

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