Polio Place

A service of Post-Polio Health International

Living With Polio

Millions of individuals who had polio are living in all areas of the world. Survivors range in age from a few months to nonagenarians (in their nineties). Aftereffects vary greatly depending on the number and location of the nerve cells destroyed by the poliovirus. The challenge or ease of living with polio varies for each survivor, depending on the availability of medical care and rehabilitation opportunities, and their family and social support.

Advice, hints, explanations, etc., are categorized by topic and are searchable. The source of the material is identified.

Reminder: PHI’s post-polio.org and IVUN’s ventusers.org or ventnews.org features numerous articles to assist in living with polio.

Research - Is It For You?

Roberta Simon, RN, Illinois

Research is an important aspect for the medical community in dealing with any health difficulty that has no previous history of known causes or treatments. Unfortunately, as we are all aware, post-polio syndrome falls into this category. Since many of us have been or will in the future be asked to participate in research, I think it is wise for us to consider a few questions and options.

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Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)

 The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol was adopted on 13 December 2006 at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, and was opened for signature on 30 March 2007. The Convention entered into force on 3 May 2008.

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Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (PL 101-336), signed by President George H. W. Bush on July 26, 1990, is first and foremost a civil rights law that establishes a clear and comprehensive prohibition of discrimination on the basis of disability.

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